Things Guys Should Know About All The Feminist Hashtags

ghomeshi

In light of the Jian Ghomeshi fiasco, trends such as #IBelieveLucy and #BeenRapedNeverReported are showing up, in support and solidarity of women. These hashtags are wonderful for raising awareness and allowing women the space to disclose, as did #WhyILeft and #WhyIStayed before them (pertaining to abusive relationships and domestic violence). It is my personal belief that these trends are helpful, and are great ways to expose issues with patriarchy head-on. All the same, I have tried to put myself in a dude’s shoes, and picture what it’s like to scroll through my newsfeed, seeing that Ghomeshi now has 9 women coming forward with information. I’ve tried to feel the cringe as I see the #BeenRapedNeverReported trend happening, and have some things I’d like to tell you, guys:

  1. Ghomeshi is not you. Thank god, who would want to be that guy right now? Ghomeshi is a public figure, a person who is being accused of sexual assault, whom everyone gets to watch, as more news  unfolds. With more info and women coming forward, people are increasingly questioning his motives and credibility (as they should, in my opinion), and if you side with him, you are indirectly supporting his actions. You indirectly think (or at least, appear to think) that his actions are acceptable. Many people have “liked” his status, who don’t condone violence, but still found him relatable enough to agree with. To me this means, these indirect supporters either think these women are lying, or they found something in his post that resonated with them.If you found Ghomeshi’s post relatable, well, maybe it’s because you like kink. Maybe you’ve had a “jilted ex” who popped your tires once. Maybe you feel bad because the guy just lost his dad, and you know how hard it is to lose someone. Either way, you are not him. It is my sincere hope that you are not being accused of assault, that you do not choke women without their consent. This is where you and Ghomeshi likely differ.
  2. Believing these women does not make you against Ghomeshi, it means you believe these women. We do not need to have “People who like Q, and hence Jian, forever and ever, xo” in one corner and “Feminists and supporters of these women, who think they’re telling the truth,” in another. A third, more inclusive option exists, which involves remembering that Jian, the self-deprecating, charming radio host and C-List celeb is separate from Jian, real person, who is accused of punching women without letting his teddy bear watch. They are separate entities, and need to be recognized as such. So, you can like what you heard from Ghomeshi, radio personality host, and still believe these women.
  3. Women very rarely lie about these matters It’s a curious thing, that we have decided as a culture that women so regularity lie about being assaulted and the like. Why is this at the forefront of our minds, and why is it Ghomeshi’s immediate defense, when the false reporting rate is only anywhere between 2-8% (depending on region)? Guys, it’s so fucking tough to report these things. If you do decide to report,It means writing out what happened, then being questioned, then followed up with, then often told “Sorry, it’s he-said-she-said, because [you didn’t do a rape kit within 72 hours], or [you didn’t report right away] or [you don’t have physical evidence] or [you don’t speak the language well] or [he’s saying you made it up (Of course he is!)], so we can’t do much more about it. Try getting counseling.” I’m serious, this still happens, and not being believed is horrible. In most cases, ain’t nobody want to go through that unless they have to (read: their lives, or the lives of their children, are endangered).

Other barriers to reporting include: fear of job loss, security, permanent victim status, reliving, shame, self-blame, embarrassment, having to face the abuser, etc etc.

To put it in perspective:Only 6 out of 100 women that are assaulted, report it. See reasons above.

Due to the ginormous hassle that is reporting assault or abuse, people very rarely lie about it. It’s way too much work, on top of dealing with the inevitable trauma following the assault.

Cat calls suck, think about it. The issue with cat calls (#StreetHarassment) are not about girl’s inability to accept a compliment, or about girls that don’t know how to be grateful. It’s about the fact that guys very often feel like they can just comment on how we look, and that it’s really creepy, most of the time.

Yesterday I was waiting for a friend at the mall when a guy walked up behind me and whispered, “You know you’re fucking gorgeous, right?” I felt my body freeze, as I thought about how he had to deliberately bend over to speak in my ear, and that I hadn’t even seen him. I stared at him without responding. He smiled slowly and said, “Can’t you hear?” I said nothing and left.

Fuck, why? I don’t know you, you don’t know me. I haven’t been eyeing you from across the room. I haven’t bought you a coffee. I’ve never seen you in my life. What makes you think you can whisper in my ear and ask me if I can hear? Go away.

Cat-calling or similar methods are a creepy form of entitlement, even if what you’re saying is “nice” in other contexts. It’s unexpected and daunting. Until it happens 300 more times, then it’s just tiring.

  1. These are problems with patriarchy, not you. Ghomeshi and related issues, are problems that arise when individuals take power and patriarchy too far. It’s a pretty pervasive problem, that manifests in different ways across the world, and hence deserves adequate attention. Issues involving patriarchy, such as the ones discussed above and millions of others, do not exist to make men feel guilty, or hated, or threatened. They do not assign blame to all men, but rather recognize a common societal issue. While patriarchy exists on a very personal level very often, issues upheld with the patriarchal system should not be mistaken for misandry. It is not meant to fill you with personal dread, it is meant to see a bigger problem, and give women a space to talk about it.

Next time you feel overwhelmed by the amount of women-related issues on your feed, I encourage you to avoid the urge to defend yourself. This isn’t about you personally. And instead of siding with Ghomeshi or thinking that women lie about assault, consider that it’s patriarchy that is telling you that. You have nothing to lose by believing these women, because you are not the one who assaulted her, and everyone benefits from your support.

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2 Comments

  1. “You have nothing to lose by believing these women, because you are not the one who assaulted her, and everyone benefits from your support.”

    Well said. This is a really important point that those in a place of privilege often don’t understand. Too often they take an attack on one member of the privileged group as an attack on all members.

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